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Full text of "The moral almanac, for the year .."

THE 



MORAL ALMAI^AC, 

FOR THE YEAR 

1843: 

BEING SECOND AFTER BISSEXTILE, OR LEAP YEAR. 



Calculated for iJie Latitude and Meridian of Pennsylvania, <^c. 




PHILADELPHIA : 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRACT ASSOCIATION OP FKIE>'DS, 

AND TO BE HAD AT THEIR DEPOSITORY, 

NO. 50, NORTH FOURTH STREET. 



J. RAKESTRAW, PRINTER. 



# 



NOTES TO THE READER. 



1. The calculations of this Almanac are made to mean solar 
time chiefly — excepting" the sun's declination, and rising and set- 
ting of the sun — which are calculated to apparent time, to which 
add the equation, when the clock is fast, and subtract when slow, 
for mean or clock time. 

2. The sun's declination is given for every noon. 

3. The rising, setting, or southing of a star, may be carried se- 
veral days backward, by adding, or forward, by subtracting, four 
minutes per day. 

ASTRONOMICAL CHARACTERS EXPLAINED. 



# New Moon. Q Full Moon. 
J) Firsts Quarter, or Moon 
C Last 3 in general. 
^ Moon's Ascending Node. 
Sun. ^2 Saturn. 

21 Jupiter. % Mars. 

9 Venus. ^ Mercury. 

T§. Georgian, or Hersehell. 



<Y* Aries, 
n Gemini. 
SI Leo. 
z^ Libra. 
f Sagittarius. 
Aquarius. 



^ Taurus. 

25 Cancer. 

^ Virgow 

tri Scorpio. 

Vj Capricornus. 

X Pisces. 



(5 Conjunction. (P Opposition. 
A Trine. QQuartile. >kSextile. 



Planets in " Conjunction," are close in the same sign, 
And when they are four signs apart they form the aspect " Trine ;' 
The " Quartile" is three signs apart — the " Sextile" is but two. 
But when six signs asunder placed, 'tis *' Opposition" true. 



COMMON NOTES, FOR 1S42. 
Dominical Letter, - - B I Lunar Cycle, - 
Solar Cycle, - - - - 3 | Epact, - - - 



19 
18 



ECLIPSES IN THE YEAR 1842. 
There will be five eclipses this year, three of the Sun, 
and two of the Moon. 

1st. Of the Sun, on the 11th of the First month, at 

11 h. 11 m. forenoon; invisible at Philadelphia. This 
eclipse will be visible only at the Cape of Good Hope. 
Duration nearly two hours, on the sun's southern limb. 

2nd. Of the Moon, on the 26th of the First month, at 

12 h. 45 m. afternoon ; invisible at Philadelphia. 

3d. Of the Sun, on the 8th of the Seventh month, at 
1 h. 57 m. morning — invisible at Philadelphia. 

4th. Of the Moon, on the 22nd of the Seventh month, 
at 5 h. 53 m. morning — invisible at Philadelphia. 

5th. Of the Sun, on the 31st of the Twelfth month, at 
1 h. 58 m. afternoon — invisible at Philadelphia. 



Times of holding the Yearly Meetings of Friends 
on the Continent of America. 

The Yearly Meeting for Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Dela- 
ware, and the eastern parts of Maryland, is held at Philadel- 
phia, the third Second-day in the Fourth month. 

The Yearly Meeting- for the state of New York, and parts 
adjacent, is held in New York, on the Second-day after the 
fourth First-day in the Fifth month. 

The Yearly Meeting of Rhode Island, for New England, be- 
gins with the meeting of Ministers and elders at Newport, 
on the Seventh-day following the second Sixth-day in the Sixtli 
month. The meeting of discipline convenes the following Se- 
cond-day. 

Baltimore Yearly Meeting, which takes in the Western Shore 
of Maryland, and part of Virginia and Pennsylvania, is held at 
Baltimore, the kst Second-day in the Tenth month. 

Ohio Yearly Meeting, which takes in the western parts of 
Pennsylvania, is held at Mount-Pleasakt, on the Second-day 
following the first First-day in the Ninth month. 

The Yearly Meeting for Virginia, is held alternately at Sum- 
merton and Cedar Creek, the Second-day after the third Sev- 
enth-day in the Fifth month : at Summerton the present year, 
(1842.) 

The Yearly Meetmg for North and South Carolina, and Ten- 
nessee, is held at New Garden, the Second-day after the first 
First-day in the Eleventh month. 

Indiana Yearly Meeting is held at White Water, the Fifth- 
day preceding the first First-day in the Tenth month. 

The Yearly Meeting of London, is held on the Fourth-day 
following the third First-day in the Fifth month. 

Dublin Yearly Meeting, is held on the Second-day following 
the last First-day in the Fourth month. 

Times of holding the Quarterly Meetings of Friends 
of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting. 

Philadelphia Quarterly Meeting is held at the meeting-house 
on Mulberry Street, Philadelphia, on the 1st Second-day in the 
2nd, 5th, 8th, and 11th months, at 10 o'clock. 

Abington Quarterly Meeting is held at Germantown, on the 
Fifth-day following the 1st Second-day in the 2nd, 5th, 8th, and 
11th months, at 10 o'clock. 

Bucks Quarterly Meeting is held the last Fiflh-day in the 5th 
and 11th months, at Falsington ; and the last Fiflh-day in the 
2nd and 8th months, at Buckingham. 



Concord Quarterly Meeting is held at Concord, on Third-day 
following the 3d Second-day in the 2nd, 5th, 8th, and 11th 
months, at 11, A. M. 

Cain Quarterly Meeting is held at East Cain, 3 miles west of 
Downingtown, on the Sixth-day following the 2nd Second-day 
in the 2nd, 5th, 8th, and 11th months, at il, A. M. 

Western Quarterly Meeting is held at London Grove, old 
house, on Sixth-day after the 3d Second-day in the 2nd, 5th, 8th, 
and 11th months, at 11, A. M. 

Burlington Quarterly Meeting is held at Burlington, on the 
Third-day after the last Second-day in the 2nd, 5th, 8th, and 
11th months, at 10, A. M. 

Haddontield Quarterly Meeting is held at Haddon field, on 
Fifth-day following the 2nd Second-day in the 3cl — at Evesham, 
in the 6th — at Upper Evesham., in tlie 9th — and at Chester, in 
the 12th month, at 10 o'clock. 

Salem Quarterly Meeting is held on the Fifth-day following 
the 2nd Second-day in the 2nd, 5th, 8th, and 11th months — at 
Salem in the 5th and 11th months — at Woodbury in the 2nd and 
8th months; at 10 o'clock, in the 5th and 8th months; at 11 
o'clock, in the 2nd and 11th months. 

Shrewsbury and Rahv/ay Quarterly Meeting is held the Fifth- 
day atler the 2nd First-day in the 2nd, 5th, 8th, and 11th months 
— at Plainfield, in the 2nd and 8th, and at Shrewsbury in the 5th 
and 11th months — all at 11, A. M., except tliat at Plainfield, in 
the 8th montli, which is at 10, A. M. 

7s War honourable and glorious ? 
What is the chief business of war ? It is to destroy 
human life ; to mangle the limbs ; to gash and hew the 
body ; to plunge the sword into the heart of a fellow-crea- 
ture ; to strew the earth with bleeding frames, and to tram- 
ple them under foot with horses' hoofs. It is to batter 
down and burn cities ; to turn fruitful fields into deserts ; 
to level the cottage of the peasant, and the magnificent 
abode of opulence ; to scourge nations with famine ; to 
multiply widows and orphans. Are these honourable 
deeds? Were we called to name exploits worthy of de- 
mons, would we not naturally select such as these ? We 
have thought that it was honourable to heal, to save, to 
mitigate pain, to snatch the sick and sinking from the 
jaws of death. We have placed among the benefactors of 
the human race, the discoverers of arts which alleviate 
human suflTerings, which prolong, comfort, adorn, and 
cheer human life ; and if these arts be honourable, where 
is the glory of multiplying and aggravating tortures and 
death. 



FIRST MONTH. 



1842. 



MOON'S PHASES. 


D. n. M. 




D. H. M. 


Last C 3 5 5 Aft. 


First ]) 19 2 56 Aft. 


New O 11 11 11 Morn. 


Full 26 1 17 Aft. 


% 


i 




iSun |Sun 


Q Sun's 


ID'S 


1 D 


D iHigti 




Remarks, 


rises 


sets 


si. 


decl. 


pla. 


rises. 


south water 


S 


d. 




|h. m. 


h. m 


^ 


south- 


s. .!. 


h. m. 


h. m.| Phiia. 


1 


7 


9 sets 3 40 


7 20 


4 40 


3 


23 1 


T^ 9 


10 22 


3 48{ 4 46 


2 


B 


§ aphelion. 


7 19 


4 41 


4 


22 56 


23 


ill 30 


4 371 5 32 


3 


2 




7 19 


4 41 


4 


22 50 


-= 7 


morn. 


5 25; 6 15 


4 


3 


I2 sets 4 11 


;7 18 


4 42 


5 


22 44 


21 


i 1 3 


6 13| 7 3 


5 


4 


Siriiis south 11 32 


7 18 


4 42 


5 


'22 37 


VII 4 


' 2 7 


7 2j 7 49 


6 


5 




;7 17 


4 43 


6 


.22 31 


17 


3 11 


7 52: 8 58 


7 


6|:^ sets 3 51 


17 17 


4 43 


6 


22 23 


30 


1 4 9 


8 4410 22 


8 


7 


9 □ 


7 16 


4 44 


7 


22 15 


/12 


5 3 


9 3711 4* 


9 


B 


Atair sets 6 32 


7 16 4 44 


7 


22 7 


24 


5 56 


10 30nnorn. 


10 


2 


21 6 (L 


7 15 4 45 


7 


2158 


>^13 


6 44 


11 20; 1 30 


11 


3!0 eclipsed, invis. 


i7 144 46 


7 


21 49 


25 


sets. 


12 10 2 7 


12 


4L 


17 14 4 46 


8 


2140 


i^ 6 


5 55 


12 57 2 45 


13 


5'(X in apogee. 


\7 14!4 46 


8 


2130 


18 


6 59 


1 42 3 17 


14 


6'Arcturu3 rises 11 20 


7 13!4 47 


9 


2119 


X 


7 5C 


2 23 3 50 


15 


r% 6 (L 


,7 12 


4 48 


9 


21 8 


12 


8 46 


3 3: 4 21 


16 


^m 6 (L 


7 11 


4 49 


9 


20 56 


2-1 


9 42 


3 42i 4 53 


17 


2i^ sup. 6 


7 10 


4 50 


10 


20 45 


T 6 


10 31 


4 22 5 13 


18 


o'\i sets 3 23 


7 9 


4 51 


10 


20 33 


18 


11 29 


5 4 5 24 


19 


4i 


7 9 


4 51 


11 


20 20 


8 1 


morn. 


5 49 5 59 


20 


5 enters i^CC^ 


7 8 


4 52 


11 


20 8 


14 


52 


6 561 6 37 


21 


67*s south 7 24 


\r 8 


4 52 


11 


19 54 


27 


1 48 


7 47 7 17 


22 


7 Arcturus rises 10 40 \7 7\ 


4 53 


11 


19 41 


ni2 


2 57 


8 36 8 20 


23 


B 1 ^ 's gr. Heli. lat. so. 


7 7 


4 s:^ 12 


19 27 


25 


5 52 


9 27 9 44 


24 


2:9 sets 4 07 


7 6 


4 54 12 


19 13 


2Z10, 


4 38 


10 18ill 11 


25 


o\ll 6 \ 


7 5 


4 5512 


18 57 


25, 


5 40 


11 19?v.2l 


26 


4t 5 eciipser], invisible. 


7 4 


4 56il2 


18 42 


SllO 


rises. 


morn.| 1 19 


27 


5J ;]) in perig-ee. 


7 3 


4 57 


13 


18 27 


25 


5 53 


12 39 2 13 


28 


ejliegulus rises 6 50 


7 2 


4 58 


13 


18 11 


^10. 


7 11 


1 56\ 2 59 


29 


7{ Orion south 8 56 


7 


5 


13 


17 55 


25; 


8 34 


2 37j 3 42 


30 


^W 6 9 


6 595 1 


13 


17 39 


-- 9 


9 34 


3 I7i 4 25 


31 


2!Sirius south 9 46 


6 5815 2 


14 


17 23 


3 10 44| 


4 7i 5 5 



Many possess much and enjoy but little ; many have much 
and use but little ; others use much, and but little well. I 
shall not so much endeavour to have much wherewithal to do 
as to do much with that little I have. I could wish I had 
more to use well, but more wish well to use that I have. If 
he were so blamed that employed not one talent well, what 
would become of me, if I had ten and abused them. 

He that runs hastily in a way he knows not, may come speed- 
ily to a home he loves not. 

B 



1842. 



SECOND MONTH. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



B. H. M. 

Last <[ 2 5 22 
New • 10 6 50 









D. 


H. 


M. 


Morn. 


First 


D 


18 


6 


36 Morn. 


Morn. 


Full 


O 


24 


11 


11 Aft. 



^ 


^ 







"0" 





Sun's 


ys 


D 


D 


High 


Remarks. 


rises 


sets 


si. 


decl. 


pla. 


rises. 


south 


water 


d 


P 




li. m. 


h. m. 


m. 


JOUtll. 


s. d. 


h. m 


h. m. 


E'hila. 


1 


"3 


7*ssetl 56 


6 57 


5 3 


14 


17 6 


m. 7 


11 54 


4 57 


5 46 


2 


4 


d'slat. 5deg. south 


6 56 


5 4 


14 


16 48 


20 


morn. 


5 47 


6 25 


3 


5 


% rises 8 49 


6 55 


5 5 


14 


16 31 


/ 3 


1 13 


6 40 


7 15 


4 


6 


^ o' ¥ 


6 54 


5 e 


14 


16 13 


15 


2 10 


7 3o 


8 17 


5 


7 




6 53 


5 7 


14 


15 55 


28 


3 3 


8 26 


9 44 


6 


B 


:il\ 6 a: 


6 52 


5 8 


14 


15 37 


VJIO 


3 52 


9 18 


11 13 


7 


2 




6 50 


5 10 


14 


15 18 


21 


4 34 


10 7 


morn. 


8 


3 


Orion south 8 14 


6 49 


5 11 


14 


14 59 


SiS 3 


5 3 


10 54 


1 12 


9 


4 


Sirius south 9 09 


6 48 


5 12 


14 


14 40 


15 


5 44 


11 39 


1 52 


10 


5 


(J in apog-ee. 


6 47 


5 13 


15 


14 21 


29 


sets. 


aft.21 


2 28 


11 


6 




6 47 


5 13 


15 


14 1 


X 9 


6 39 


1 2 


2 58 


12 


7 


Spica rises 10 09 


6 46 


5 14 


15 


13 42 


21 


7 39 


1 42 


3 26 


13 


B 


¥ d ]) 


6 45 


5 15 


15 


13 23 


cf 3 


8 35 


2 22 


3 52 


14 


2 


Castor south 9 00 


6 43 


5 17 


15 


13 1 


15 


9 32 


3 3 


4 20 


15 


3 


1$ *s gr. elonp^. east. 


6 42 


5 18 


15 


12 41 


27 


10 50 


3 46 


4 50 


16 


/i 


a *s lat. 5 deg-. north. 


6 41 


5 19 


15 


12 22 


yio 


11 43 


4 33 


5 7 


17 


5 


\2 sets 1 40 


6 40 


5 20 


14 


11 58 


23 


morn. 


5 23 


5 20 


18 


6 


enters X 


6 38 


5 22 


14 


1137 


n 6 


48 


6 18 


5 59 


19 


7 


Sinus south 8 30 


6 37 


5 23 


14 


11 16 


19 


1 48 


7 17 


6 50 


20 


B 


(J in perig'ee. 


6 36 


5 24 


!4 


10 54 


25 3 


2 17 


8 19 


7 51 


21 


2 


^ stationar)'. 


6 35 


5 25 


14 


10 33 


18 


3 49 


9 21 


9 13 


22 


3 


9 sets 5 24 


6 34 


5 26 


14 


10 11 


a 3 


4 29 


10 21 


10 47 


23 


4 


2/ sets 1 31 


6 32 


5 28 


14 


9 49 


18 


5 13 


11 16 


ev. 6 


24 


5 




6 31 


5 29 


14 


9 27 


m 3 


rises. 


morn. 


1 8 


25 


6 




6 30 


5 30 


13 


9 5 


18 


6 10 


12 10 


156 


26 


7 


Spica rises 9 17 


6 2S 


5 32 


13 


8 43 


rib 3 


7 16 


1 3 


2 39 


27 


B 


% rises 7 51 


6 27 


5 33 


13 


8 20 


18 


8 38 


1 55 


3 20 


28 


2 




6 26 


5 34 


13 


7 58 


ni 2 


9 46 


2 45 


3 59 



Venus ( 9 ) will be Morning Star until the 5th of the Third Month ; 
then Evening Star until the 18th of the Twelfth Month ; then Morn- 
ing Star until the 2nd of the Tenth Month, 1843. 

A poor man can be content, when the contented man only 
is rich. We are not rich or poor, by what we possess, but by 
what we desire. For he is not rich that^hath much, but he 
that hath enoua^h : nor he poor that hath but little, but he that 
wants more. If God then make me rich by store, I will not 
impoverish myself by covetousness ; but if he make me poor 
by want, I will enrich myself by content. 

No law of nature is more immutable than that law which 
binds together misery and guilt. God is just. 



THIRD MONTH. 



1842. 



MOON'S PHASES. 


D. H. M. 


i D. H. M. 


Last C 3 8 18 Afl. 


First 3) 19 6 37 Aft. 


New ©12 1 24 > 


orn. 


Full O 26 8 52 Morn. 


% 


^ 




Sun 


Sun 


OO's 


3)'s 


^ 1 


D 


High 


Remarks. 


rises 


sets 


si (led. 


pla. 


rises. 1 


south 


water 


a 


3' 
3 




h. m 


h. m. 


111. sOIUll. 


s. d. 


h. m., 


1. m. 


Phila. 


1 


% rises 7 54 j 


6 24 


5 36!l2i7 33 


vtiU 


10 47 


3 38 


4 39 


2 


4 


1 


6 23 


5 37 


1217 13 


29 


11 56 


4 32 


5 16 


3 


5 


^ 6 Q inferior. j 


6 21 


5 39 


12:6 47 


/12 


morn. 


5 28 


5 59 


4 


6 


:^ sets 3 37 


6 20 


5 40 


12'6 24 


^24 


1 52 


6 22 


6 47 


5 


7 


9 (^ sup. near © 


6 20 


5 4011115 


Vj 6 


2 45 


7 15 


7 47 


6B 


:u 6 d 


6 19|5 41|ll!5 36 


18 


3 27 


8 5 


9 14 


7 


2 


Sirius south 7 34 


6 1815 42 115 13 


^ 


4 2 


8 52 


10 39 


8 


3 


C in apogee. 


6 16'5 44!114 50 


12 


4 31 


9 37 


11 53 


9 


4 


Spica rises 8 34 


6 15 5 45 10 4 26 


24 


5 


10 20 


morn. 


10 5 


7*s set 11 25 


6 14'5 46 104 3 


X 6 


5 22 


11 1 


1 28 


11 6 


9 6 <L 


6 12i5 48jl0 


3 39 


18 


5 44 


11 41 


2 


12i 7 




6 11,5 49il0 


3 16 


^ 


sets. 


aft. 22 


2 31 


ISB 


9 sets 6 08 


6 105 50 


9 


2 52 


12 


6 40 


1 3 


2 58 


14-1 2 


¥ d 


6 8i5 52 


9 


2 29 


24 


7 5 


1 45 


3 26 


15| 3 


^ stationar)'. 


6 7\5 53 


9 


2 5 


« 7 


8 8 


2 31 


3 55 


16: 4 


ij sets 12 03 


6 65 54 


8 


1 41 


19 


9 35 


3 21 


4 28 


171 5 


Arcturus rises 7 05 


6 4 5 56 


8|l 18 


n 2 


10 35 


4 13 


4 40 


18| 6 


2/ sets 12 19 


6 35 57 


8iO 54 


16 


11 36 


5 9 


5 3 


191 7 




6 2:5 58 


8 


30 


29 


morn. 


6 7 


5 43 


20B 


enters ^ 


6 o:6 


7 


S.16 


5513 


1 37 


7 6 


6 32 


21i 2 


Uav & nig-ht equal. 


5 59,6 1 


7 


N.16 


27 


2 22 


8 5 


7 35 


22' 3 


9 sets 6 27 


5 58 6 2 


7 


40 


ai2 


3 2 


9 1 


9 8 


23' 4 


([; in perigee. 


5 566 4 


6 


1 4 


26 


3 38 


9 55 


10 40 


24: 5 


:^in^ 


5 556 5 


6 


1 27 


rr^U 


4 9 


10 47 


11 54 


25 


6 




5 546 6 


6 


1 51 


26 


4 38 


11 38 


ev. 46 


26 


7 




5 52 6 8 


5 


2 14 


-=11 


rises. 


morn. 


1 32 


27 


B 


Spica rises 8 12 


5 5116 9 


5 


2 38 


26 


7 17 


12 30 


2 15 


28 


2 


Sirius sets 11 17 


5 50l6 10 


5 


3 1 


Tn.12 


8 22 


1 23 


2 56 


29 


3 


1 


15 49,6 11 


4 


3 25 


24 


9 3.3 


2 18 


3 37 


30 


4 


^ 's greatest elonga. 


,5 4816 13 


4 


3 4S 


/ 7 


10 36 


3 14 


4 18 


31 


1 5 


r runs low. 


15 4616 I4l 4 


4 111 20 


11 35 


4 9 


4 57 



Two sorts of blessings. 
" It is a great blessing to possess what one wishes," said 
some one to an ancient philosopher ; who replied, " It is a 
greater blessing still, not to desire what one does not possess." 

Hyprocrisy desires to seem good rather than to be so : 
honesty desires to be good, rather than seem so. It shall 
more joy me that I know myself what I am, than it shall 
grieve me to hear what others report me. I had rather de- 
serve well without praise, than do ill with commendation. 



1842. 



FOURTH MONTH. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



Last 

New 



B. H. 

2 1 
10 5 



M. 

25 Aft. 
27 Aft. 



First 
Full 



D. 

D 18 

O 24 



28 Morn. * 
23 Aft. 



^ 


i 




Sun 


Sun 





Sun's 


y^ 


J) 


D 


High 




Eemarks. 


rises 


sets 


si. 


decl. 


pla. 


rises. 


south 


water 


Q 


~6 




ii. m 


li. m. 


m. 


north. 


s. d. 


h. m. 


li. m 


Phila. 


1 


5 statioriaiy. 


5 45 


6 15 


~4 


4 34 


\^ y 


morn. 


5 4 


5 39 


2 


7 


21 6 a 


5 44 


6 16 


3 


4 57 


15 


1 25 


5 57 


6 25 


3 


B 


% rises 6 45 


5 43 


6 17 


3 


5 20 


27 


1 59 


6 46 


7 20 


4 


2 


21 rises 1 57 


5 42 


6 18 


3 


5 43 


/VM. g 


2 35 


7 33 


8 34 


5 


3 


a in apogee. 


5 40 


6 20 





6 6 


"^20 


3 


8 16 


10 2 


6 


4 


b rises 1 17 


5 39 


6 21 


2 


6 29 


X 2 


3 26 


8 59 


11 15 


7 


5 


7*s set 10 00 


5 38 


6 22 


2 


6 52 


14 


3 49 


9 38 


morn. 


8 


6 


^ 6 (L 


5 37 


6 23 


1 


7 14 


26 


4 26 


10 19 


56 


9 


7 


Reg-ulus south 8 50 


5 36 


6 24 


1 


7 36 


ff 8 


5 24 


10 59 


11 24 


10 


B 




5 35 


6 25 


1 


7 58 


21 


sets. 


11 43 


1 55 


11 


2 




5 33 


6 27 


1 


8 20 


8 4 


7 29 


aft. 28 


2 25 


12 


3 


XnQ 


5 32 


6 28 





8 42 


16 


8 32 


1 16 


2 57 


13 


4 




531 


6 29 





9 4 


29 


9 34 


2 9 


3 30 


14 


5 


Spica south 11 42 


5 30 


6 30 





9 25 


ni3 


10 34 


3 4 


4 9 


15 


6 




5 29 


631 


fst 


9 47 


26 


11 32 


4 2 


4 46 


16 


7 


7*s set 9 28 


5 27 


6 33 





10 8 


gslO 


morn. 


4 59 


5 1 


17 


B 


Vega rises 8 09 


5 26 


6 34 





10 29 


24 


29 


5 58 


5 31 


18 


2 




5 25 


6 35 





10 50 


SI 8 


1 13 


6 53 


6 26 


19 


3 




5 24 


6 36 





1111 


22 


1 57 


7 46 


7 31 


20 


4 


enters ^ 


5 23 


6 37 


1 


1132 


^ 6 


2 30 


8 35 


8 58 


21 


5 


Jf in perigee. 


5 22 


6 38 


1 


1150 


21 


2 58 


9 27 


10 17 


22 


6 


Sirids sets 9 30 


5 20 


6 40 


1 


12 13 


Z& 5 


3 28 


10 17 


11 26 


23 


7 


I2 stationaiy. 


5 19 


6 41 


1 


12 33 


20 


4 


11 1 


ev. 18 


24 


B 




5 18 


6 42 


1 


12 50 


ITL 4 


rises. 


morn. 


1 10 


25 


2 


D'slat. 5deg'. south. 


5 16 


6 43 


2 


13 12 


18 


7 18 


2 


1 54 


26 


3 


% south 1 03 


5 16 


6 44 


2 


13 32 


/ 2 


8 19 


58 


2 34 


27 


4 


9 sets 7 50 


5 15 


6 45 


2 


13 51 


^15 


9 23 


1 55 


3 18 


28 


5 


Vega rises 7 17 


5 13 


6 47 


2 


14 10 


28 


10 20 


2 52 


3 58 


29 


6 


21 south 5 06 


5 12 


6 48 


2 


14 29 


VJll 


11 12 


3 46 


4 38 


30 


7 




5 11 


6 49 


2 


14 37 


23 


11 42' 4 38 


5 16 



To deny the right of a human being to himself, to his own 
limbs and faculties, to his energy of body and mind, is an ab- 
surdity too gross to be confuted by any thing but a simple 
statement. Yet this absurdity is involved in the idea of his 
belonging to another. 

The duration of wron^, and the increase of it by contin- 
uance, cannot convert it into right. 

Consider, not what might have been done, but what is now 
to be done. 



FIFTH MONTH. 



1842 



MOON'S PHASES. 


D. H. Jf. 




D. U. M. 


Last C 2 7 40 Morn. 


First 1) 17 7 4 Morn. 


New #10 6 32 Morn. 


Full 24 4 33 Morn. 


^'h 




Sun Sun | 


G 


Sun's 


D's 


D 


D 


High 


Remarks. 


rises 


sets 


fst 


decl. 


pla. 


rises. 


south. 


water 


ai^; 




h. m. 


h. m. 


Hi 


north. 


s. d. 


h. m. 


h. m. 

5 26 


Phila. 


IB 


^ rises 12 11 


5 10 


6 50 


3 


15 5 


2x;s 5 


morn | 


6 


2i 2 


Yl rises 11 35 


5 9 


6 51 


3 


15 23 


17 


1 17| 6 12 


6 49 




^ in apogee. 


5 8 


6 52 


3 


15 41 


29 


1 571 6 54 


7 55 


4! 4 


Arcturus south 11 25 


5 7 


6 53 






15 58 


XlO 


2 27j 7 35 


9 5 


51 5 


2/ west a 


5 6 


6 54 


3 


16 15 


22 


2 56 8 15 


1012 


6 6 


I2 west C 


5 5 


6 55 


3 16 32 


^ 5 


3 24 8 55 


1114 


7'; 7 


9 sets 8 12 


5 4 


6 56 


3; 16 49 


17 


3 51 9 51 


morn. 


8,B 


J^ rises 11 44 


5 5 6 57| 


3|17 6 


30 


4 19 10 22 


40 


91 2 


3's lat. 5 cleg-, north. 


5 2 


6 58 


3 17 22 


yi2 


4 52 11 8 


117 


10 


3 




5 1 


6 59 


3 17 38 


26 


sets, laft. 1 


154 


11 


4 


9 c$ (T 


5 


7 


3 17 55 


n 9 


8 24 56 


2 33 


12 


5 


Sirius sets 8 25 


4 59 


7 1 


3:18 9 


23 


9 24 1 56 


3 12 


13; 6 


^ south 45 


4 58 


7 2 


3|l8 24 


25 6 


10 191 2 55 


3 55 


14 7 


5 in perihelion. 


4 57 


7 3 


3:18 38 


20 


11 8 


3 54 


4 39 


15B 


Arcturus soutli 10 15 


4 56 


7 4 


3 18 53 


SI 4 


11 47 


4 50 


4 55 


161 2 


^69 


4 55|7 5 


3:19 7 


18 


morn. 


5 43 


5 26 


in 3 


(^ in per;g-ee. 


4 54J7 6 


3 119 21 


TTj; 3 


52 


6 33 


6 23 


18| 4 


Spica south 9 35 


4 537 7 


3 119 34 


17 


1 22 


7 22 


7 24 


19; 5 




4 5217 8 


3 !l9 46 


-- 1 


1 56| 8 11 


8 35 


201 6 


Lyra souih 2 51 


4 5217 8 


3 ,19 59 


15 


2 241 9 


9 49 


21j 7 


Q enters n 


4 5117 9 


3 '20 11 


29 


3 8, 9 51 


10 57 


22 B 


% south 36 


4 5017 10 


3 


20 23 


rril3 


3 3710 45 


1152 


23i 2 


seis 8 46 


4 49i7 11 


3 


20 35 


■^7 


4 17,11 41 


ev.45 


24 


3 




4 48 7 12 


3 


20 46 


/lO 


l-ises. 


morn. 


135 


25 


4 


2/ rises 10 36 


4 4817 12 


3 


20 57 


23 


8 6 


38 


2 20 


26 


5 


12 rises 9 53 


4 48 


17 12 





21 8 


Vj 6 


9 1 


1 34 


2 59 


27 


6 


! D^slat. 1 19 north. 


4 47 


i7 13 


3 


21 18 


19 


9 48 


2 28 


3 39 


28 


7 


'^9 6 


4 47 


17 13 


3 


i21 28 


^ 1 


10 28 


3 18 


417 


29 


B 


\% rises 10 21 


4 46 


|7 14 


2 


21 38 


13 


11 


4 5 


4 54 


30 


2 


1 h rises 9 44 


I445 


7 15 


2 


2147 


25 


11 49 


4 49 


5 37 


:3l' 3^ 1) in apoeree. 


|4 45:7 15 


2 


21 56 


IX 6 


morn.' 5 31 


6 20 



One great part of the mission of every man on earth, is to 
contend with evil in some of its forms ; aiid there are some 
evils so dependent on opinion, that every man in judging and 
reproving them faithfully, does something towards their re- 
moval. 

Buy what thou hast not need of, and ere long thou mayst 
sell what thou hast need of. 

He who waits till all difficulties are removed, will never act. 
B2 



1842. 



SIXTH MONTH. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



Last C 1 
New ® 8 
First J) 15 



H. M. 

1 45 Morn. 

5 7 Aft. 

11 45 Morn. 



D. H. M. 

Full O 22 4 15 Aft. 
Last d 30 6 34 Aft. 



1i 


^ 




Sun 


Sun 





Sun's 


rs 


D 


D 


High 




Remarks. 


rises 


sets 


f»t 


decl. 


pla. 


rises. 


south 


water 


Q 


Q 




h. m. 


1. m. 


ni. 


noitji 


s. d. 


li. m. 


h. m. 


Phila, 


1 


4 




4 44 


7 16 


■^ 


22 3 


X18 


29 


6 10 


7 8 


2 


5 


% sets 7 48 


4 44 


7 16 


2 


22 11 


^ 


1 12 


6 50 


8 


3 


6 


Jl sets 10 00 


4 43 


7 17 


2 


22 19 


13 


1 59 


7 31 


8 59 


4 


7 


^ in perihelion. 


4 4^ 


7 18 


2 


22 26 


25 


2 27 


8 16 


10 


5 


B 


])'s lat. 5 deg-. north. 


4 41 


7 19 


1 


22 23 


« ^ 


2 55 


9 1 


10 59 


6 


2 


9 sets 9 08 


4 41 


7 19 


1 


22 39 


21 


3 32 


9 56 


1156 


7 


3 


Spica east J) 


4 41 


7 19 


1 


22 46 


n 4 


3 52 


10 45 


morn 


8 


4 




4 41 


7 19 


1 


22 51 


18 


sets. 


11 43 


132 


9 


5 


S (5 C 


4 41 


7 19 


1 


22 57 


S 2 


8 3 


aft. 44 


218 


10 


6 


9 c? C 


4 40 


7 20 


1 


23 1 


16 


8 58 


1 44 


3 2 


11 


7 


^ 's g-r. elong-ation. 


4 40 


7^20 





23 6 


a 1 


9 52 


2 43 


3 46 


12 


B 


C in peri.Q;ee. 


4 40 


7 20 





23 10 


15 


10 41 


3 38 


4 33 


13 


2 


Ueg-ulus sets 11 23 


4 40 


7 20 





23 14 


29 


11 31 


4 31 


4 55 


14 


3 


% sets 7 33 


4 40 


7 20 





23 16 


ir^H. 


11 58 


5 20 


5 20 


15 


4 




4 40 


7 20 


si. 


23 19 


28 


morn 


6 8 


611 


16 


5 


Spica south 4 21 


4 39 


7 21 





23 21 


--12 


31 


6 57 


7 7 


17 


6 


Vega soutli 11 10 


4 39 


7 21 





23 23 


26 


1 1 


7 47 


8 


18 


7 


iieg-ulus south 7 46 


4 39 


7 21 





To 2.5 


Til 9 


1 35 


8 39 


9 3 


19 


B 


¥ □ 


4 39 


7 21 





23 26 


23 


2 15 


9 33 


1013 


20 


2 


9 sets 9 18 


4 39 


7 21 




23 27 


/ 6 


3 2 


10 28 


1130 


21 


o 


O enters gs 


4 38 


7 22 




23 27 


19 


3 53 


11 23 


ev-33 


•32 


4 




4 38 


r 22 




23 27 


]^ 2 


rises. 


morn. 


125 


23 


5 


h 6 a 


4 38 


7 22 




23 27 


14 


7 29 


18 


2 9 


24 


6 


^ stationary. 


4 3? 


7 23 




23 25 


27 


8 19 


1 10 


2 49 


25 


7 


V rises 11 19 


4 36 


r 24 


2 


23 24 


CJ? 9 


8 53 


1 59 


3 26 


26 


B 


^ sets 7 25 


4 36 


7 24 


2 


23 22 


21 


9 24 


2 44 


4 1 


27 


2 


Spica sets 10 40 


4 36 


7 24 


2 


25 20 


X 3 


9 49 


3 26 


435 


28 


3 


H south 12 25 


4 36 


7 24 


2 


23 17 


14 


10 8 


4 7 


5 9 


29 


4 


I2 south 12 18 


4 36 


7 24 





23 14 


26 


11 


4 46 


5 47 


30 


5 




4 36 


7 24 


2 


23 11 


^ 8 


11 56 


5 26 


6 25 



O the sure and bountiful payment of the Almighty ! Who 
ever came under his wing in vain? Who ever lost by trust- 
ing him? Who ever forsook the Moab of this world for the 
true Israel, and did not at last rejoice in the change ? 

There may be idolatry in our attachments to our friends. 
Whenever we delight in any thing more than in God, we are 
idolaters. We must love him supremely, with all our heart, 
soul and mind, that is, with the utmost intensity: which is no 
hard requisition, for it only requires us to be as happy as our 
nature will allow. 



SEVENTH MONTH. 



1842. 



MOON^S PHASES. 



New 

First 



14 



H. 


M. 




D. 


H. 


M. 


1 


54 Morn. 


Full 


O 22 


5 


51 Morn 


4 


59 Aft. 


Last 


a 30 


9 


35 Morn 



^ -«? 




Sun 


Sun 





Sun'^ 


3)'s 


.J) 


D 


High 


^ 


<" 


Remarks. 


I'ises 


sets 


si. 


decl. 


pla. 


rises. 


south. 


water 


Q 


"6 




li. in. 


h. 111. 


111. 


iioiih- 


S. (1 


h. m. 


Ii. in • 


Phila. 


'i 


9 rises 6 09 


4 4u 


7^0 


3 


23 7 


T21 


morn 


6 y 


7 2 


2 


7 


2;J south 12 38 


4 40 


7 20 


3 


23 3 


« 3 


45 


6 52 


7 48 


3 


li 


in apogee. I2 <? 


4 41 


7 19 


3 


22 58 


""le 


1 47 


7 39 


8 44 


4 


2 


Ij south 11 57 


4 41 


7 19 


3 


22 53 


29 


2 25 


8 30 


9 59 


5 


o 
^ 


% south 11 51 


4 41 


7 19 


4 


22 48 


ni3 


2 57 


9 27 


11 13 


6 


4 


9 rises 7 17 


4 41 


7 19 


4 


22 42 


27 


3 29 


10 27 


morn. 


7 


5 


^ c5 C 


4 42 


7 18 


4 


22 36 


Sll 


4 12 


11 29 


1 14 


8 


6 




4 42 


7 18 


4 


22 20 


25 


sets. 


.ift.29 


2 5 


9 


7 


?pica sets 8 28 


4 43,7 17 


4 


22 23 


aio 


8 29 


1 28 


2 51 


10 


B 


2/ c? Q 


4 4417 16 


4 


22 15 


25 


9 4 


2 22 


3 37 


11 


2 


Lyra south 11 10 


4 44'7 16 


5 


22 7 


mo 


9 36 


3 15 


4 22 


12 


3 




4 44I7 16 


5 


21 59 


24 


10 5 


4 5 


4 43 


13 


4 


Fomalha. south 3 19 


4447 15 


5 


21 50 


-= 9 


10 48 


4 54 


5 5 


14 


5 




4 45'7 15 


5 


2141 


23 


11 20 


5 44 


5 5U 


15 


6 


7»s south 8 01 


4 457 15 


5 


2132 


rri 6 


morn. 


6 35 


6 36 


16 


7 


Antares south 8 38 


4 467 14 


5 


2123 


20 


5 


7 29 


7 20 


17 


B 


Regulus sets 2 14 


4 467 14 


5 


21 12 


/ 3 


55 


8 23 


8 22 


18 


2 




4 47 7 13 


5 


20 2 


16 


1 29 


9 18 


9 43 


19 


3 


Dog- days begin. 


4 47i7 13 


5 


20 .52 


28 


2 9 


10 12 


11 9 


20 


4 


h c 


4 487 12 


5 


20 41 


VjU 


2 47 


11 5 


ev. 19 


21 


5 


Arcturus south 12 00 


4 48:7 12 


6 


20 29 


23 


3 22 


11 53 


1 13 


22 


6 


J) eclipsed, invisible. 


4 49|7 11 


6 


20 6 


■CJO^ 5 


rises. 


morn. 


1 58 


23 


7 




4 50 


7 10 


6 


19 52 


17 


7 40 


40 


2 37 


24 


B 


Vega south 10 18 


4 50 


7 10 


6 


19 40 


29 


8 30 


1 28 


3 9 


25 


2 


C in apogee. 


4 51 


7 9 


6 


19 27 


xii 


9 5 


2 5 


3 40 


26 


3 




4 52 


7 8 


6 


19 13 


23 


9 25 


2 44 


4 10 


27 


4 


¥ d (T 


4 53 


7 7 


6 


18 


T 5 


10 12 


3 24 


4 41 


28 


5 


Castor south 10 55 


4 54 


7 6 


6 


18 46 


17 


10 40 


4 4 


5 11 


29 


6 


^ 's gr. elongation. 


4 55 


7 5 


6 


18 31 


29 


11 20 


4 47 


5 45 


30 


7 




4 5f 


7 4 


6 


18 17 


«1^ 


11 31 


5 31 


6 20 


31 


B 


])'s lat. 5 deg. north 


4 56'7 4 


_6 


18 2 


24 


morn. 


6 20 


6 59 



There must be a harmony in our duties. We cannot per- 
form some aright, while we wilfully neglect others. The soul 
must at all times be kept in a holy frame of obedience ; we 
must have respect unto all the commandments of God, if we 
would be his children. 

If, at every night, we were obliged to give an account of 
the day to God, would not our manner of spending it be dif- 
ferent ? The time of reckoning is only deferred. We may 
forget, but God will not forget the slightest action. 



1842. 



EIGHTH MONTH. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



New ® 
Pirst J) 



H. 

9 
12 



39 Morn. 
15 Morn. 



Full 
Last 



D. 

O 20 
(T 28 



H. M. 

9 7 Aft. 
10 43 Aft. 



% 


> 


|Sun |Sun [Q 


Sun's 


ys 


,J> , 3) 


High 


^ 


Remarks. } 


rises 


sets.jsl 


dec]. 


pla 


rises. 


south. 


water 


a 


2 




1. m 


h m. m 


iiDith. 


s. d. 

n 7 


h . m. 


h. m 


Phiia. 


1 


7*s rise 11 29 


4 57 


7 316 


18 2 


"Tie 


7 13 


7 58 


2 


3 


2/ sets 2 57 


4 58 


7 2' 5 


17 47 


21 


2 31 


8 19 


9 18 


3 


4 


I2 sets 2 30 


4 59 


7 i;5 


17 31 


25 5 


3 27 


9 10 


10 44 


4 


5 


% sets 7 20 


5 


7 0|5 


1715 


19 


4 14 


10 10 


11 58 


5 


6 


$? d <2 


5 1 


6 59 5 


16 59 


SI 4 


4 50 


11 10 


morn. 


6 


7 




5 2 


6 58 5 


16 43 


19 


sets. 


aft. 8 


1 51 


7 


B 


(£ in perigee. 


5 3 


6 5715 


16 26 


TTK 4 


7 9 


1 3 


2 37 


8 


2 


Atair south 10 53 


5 4 6 56; 5 


16 9 


19 


8 4 


1 56 


3 22 


9 


3 


9 6^ 


5 5 6 55 5 


15 51 


^ 4 


8 38 


2 47 


4 3 


10 


4 


'^ in perihelion. 


5 6 6 54 5 


15 34 


19 


9 9 


3 38 


4 41 


11 


5 


Antares south 6 46 


5 7 6 53 5 


15 16 


Ti^ 3 


9 39 


4 31 


5 8 


12 


6 


Arcturus south 4 42 


5 17 6 4915 


14 58 


16 


10 8 


5 24 


5 23 


13 


7 


2)'3 kt. 5 (leg. south. 


5 12 


6 48 4 


14 40 


/ 


10 45 


6 19 


6 6 


14 


B 


$ rises 8 36 


5 13 


6 47 


4 


14 22 


13 


11 17 


7 13 


6 56 


lo 


2 


h 6 (L 


5 13 


6 47 


4 


14 3 


25 


morn. 


8 8 


7 57 


16 


3 




5 14 


6 46 


4 


13 44 


V3 8 


1 5 


9 1 


9 23 


17 


4 


% sets 6 06 


5 15 


6 45 


4 


13 25 


20 


2 3 


9 50 


10 54 


18 


5 


Aldebaran south 6 37 


5 1716 43 


4 


13 6 




3 1 


10 38 


ev. 9 


19 


6 




5 18 


6 42 


3 


12 47 


14 


3 57 


11 21 


59 


20 


7 




5 19 


6 41 


3 


12 27 


26 


rises. morn. 


142 


21 


B 


J) in apogee. 


5 20 


6 40 


3 


12 7 


X 8 


6 22 


3 


216 


22 


2 




5 21 


6 39 


3 


1147 


20 


6 58 


44 


2 48 


23 


3 


enters '^ 


5 22 


6 38 


2 


1127 


cf 2 


7 37 


1 23 


3 15 


24 


4 


Sirius rises 3 22 


5 24 


6 36 


2 


11 6 


13 


8 5 


2 3 


3 42 


25 


5 


9 rises 8 55 


5 25\6 35'2 


10 46 


26 


8 47 


2 45 


4 8 


26 


6 


21 sets 1 17 


5 26|6 34I 1 


10 25 


8 8 


9 27 


3 28 


4 38 


27 


7 


X)'3 lat. 5 deg. north. 


5 27 6 33 |1 


10 4 


20 


10 7 


4 14 


5 8 


28 


B 




5 28(6 32| 1 


9 43 


n 3 


10 57 


5 4 


5 47 


29 


2 


7*s rise 9 23 


|5 29 
5 31 


6 31 1 


9 42 


16 


11 32 


5 58 


6 32 


30 


3 


\2 sets 12 38 


6 29 


9 


29 


morn. 


1 6 55 


7 30 


31 


4 


Antares sets 10 12 


5 32 


6 2810 


8 39 


2cl3 


2 13 7 54 


8 54 



To wisdom it certainly belongs, that men should be im- 
pressed with just views of their nature, and their state ; and 
the pleasures of life will always be enjoyed to most advantage 
when they 9,re tempered with serious thought. There is a 
time to mourn, as well as a time to rejoice. There is a vir- 
tuous sorrow, which is better than laughter. There is a sad- 
ness of the countenance, by which the heart is made better. 

If promotion be so dangerous I will take leave of being 
ambitious. I am high enough if I can stand upright. 



NINTH MONTH., 



1842. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



New 
First 



4 
11 



H. 

5 

10 



11 Aft. 
54 Morn. 



Full 

Last 



D. 

19 

27 



H. 
1 

10 



M. 

29 Aft. 
1 Morn. 



Sli 




Sun Sun 


0jSun's,D's| 


D 1 3) High 


'^ ll^ 


Remarks. 


rises 


sets 


fs. 


decl. 


pla. 


rises, jsouth. 


water 


c!a 




h. m. 


h. m 


■r.. 


nertli 


1 d. 


Ii. m.'h. m. 


Phila. 


i; 5 


Dog- days end. 


5 33 


6 27 





8"r6 


2527 


3 I8i 8 52 


10 25 


2 6 


9 rises 9 10 


5 34 


6 26 





7 54 


ai2 


4 23 9 50 


11 42 


3 r 


% sets 5 29 


5 35|6 25 


1 


7 32 


27 


5 27il0 47tmorn. 


4B 


(j; in perigee. 


5 36 6 24 


1 


7 10 


TIX13 


sets. In 40| 1 33 


5 2 


9 6 a 


5 386 22 


1 


6 48 


28 


7 lidft.33| 2 19 


6 3 


Sirius south 7 40 


5 39!6 21 


2 


6 25 


-13 


7 40. 1 261 2 58 


7 4 




5 40j6 20 


2 


6 3 


28 


8 6 2 20 3 37 


8 5 


B's eye south 5 17 


5 416 19 


2 


5 40 


iT\^12 


8 34 3 14 


4 17 


9i 6 


21. stationary. 


5 42l6 18 


o 
O 


5 18 


26 


9 4| 4 10 


4 59 


lOl 7 


Vega south 7 18 


5 45 6 15 


3 


4 55 


/ 9 


9 32i 5 8 


5 20 


11 B 


b stationary. 


5 46 6 14 


3 


4 32 


22 


10 201 6 4 

11 20| 6 54 


5 44 


12 2 


H c5 (^ 


5 47i6 13 


4 


4 9 


V? 5 


6 33 


13 3 


^' 6 d — ^ in ^ 


5 48^6 12 


4 


3 46 


17 


morn. 7 47 7 32 


14; 4 


9 □ 


5 49 6 11 


4 


3 23 


29 


1 22! 8 35i 8 57 


15 5 


Arcturus sets 9 46 


5 50 6 10 


5 


3 


^n 


2 271 9 21110 24 


16' 6 


2/ s.ts U 54 


5 516 9 


5 


2 37 


23 


3 25110 2 


11 43 


17i ^ 


Orion south 5 28 


5 52 6 8 


5 


2 14 


>£ 5 


4 23 10 43 


ev. 38 


188 


C in apogee. 


5 53 6 7 


6 


1 51 


17 


5 27|11 23 


1 15 


19 2 


¥ c? 


5 556 5 


6 


1 28 


29 


rises.jmorn. 


1 52 


20! 3 


2/ Ij west C 


5 576 3 


6 


1 4 


TU 


6 18! 3 


2 20 


21' 4 


Aniares south 4 L'7 


5 58 6 2 


7 


N.41 


23 


6 43i 43 


2 44 


221 5 


Procyon sets 1 53 


5 596 1 


7 


S.18 


« 5 


7 12l 1 27 


3 10 


23 6 


O enters =cb 


6 0'6 


7 





17 


7 44! 2 12 


3 38 


24 7 


Atair south 7 40 


6 15 59 


8 


28 


n 


8 15; 3 1 


4 8 


251 B 


9 rises 9 51 


6 2 5 58 


8 


52 


12 


8 47! 3 52 


4 45 


26 2 


Sirius rises 1 33 


6 3 5 57 


8 


1 15 


25 


9 37i 4 47 


5 24 


27 3 




6 55 55 


9 


1 39 


55 9 


10 32: 5 44 


6 11 


28 4 


Orion rises 10 15 


6 65 54 


9 
9 


2 2 


22 


11 33i 6 41 


7 10 


29 5 


7*s rise 7 54 


6 7|5 53 


2 25 


a 6 


morn. 7 37 


8 32 


30' 6 


Vega south 6 06 


6 8 


!5 52 


IG 


12 49 


21 


1 42 8 31 


10 6 



Whenever we find ourselves more inclined to persecute, 
than to persuade, we may then be certain that our zeal has 
more of pride in it, than of charity, that we are seeking vic- 
tory rather than truth, and are beginning to feel more for our- 
selves than for our Master. 

Reputation would not be so highly valued if we did but seri- 
ously consider how very unjust the generality of men are, both 
in the giving it and taking it away. We should content our- 
selves to deserve it by good behaviour, and when that care is 
taken, not to be over anxious about the success. 



1842. 



TENTH MONTH. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



D. H, M. 

New O 4 1 19 Morn. 
First 3 11 1 36 Morn. 



D. 

Full O 19 
Last C 26 



H. 

6 

7 



8 Morn, 
36 Aft. 



s 


> 




Sun 


Sun 





Sun's ])'s 3 


D 


High 




<< 


Remarks. 


rises 


sets. 


fst 


decl. pla. 


rises. 


south 


water 


p 


1 




h. in. 

6 10 


h. m. 


m. 


south. s. d. 


h. ni. 


h. m 


Phila. 


1 


hnO— -SdCL 


5 50 


10 


312TrK 6 


2 52 


9 24 


11 24 


2 


B 


9 rises 10 02 


6 11 


5 49 


10 


3 35 21 


4 2 


10 17 


morn. 


3 


2 


C in perigee. 


6 12 


5 48 


10 


3 59=n= 6 


5 4 


11 10 


1 8 


4 


3 


Sirius rises 12 05 


6 14 


5 46 


11 


4 22| 21 


sets. 


aft. 4 


153 


5 


4 


9 6 C 


6 15 


5 45 


11 


4 45n\^ 6 


5 47 


1 


2 32 


6 


5 




6 16 


5 44 


11 


5 8 20 


6 19 


1 56 


3 14 


7 


6 


:^ no 


6 18 


5 42 


12 


531 / 4 
5 54! 18 


6 S5 


2 55 


3 56 


8 


7 


5 *s g-r. elong-ation. 


6 19 


5 4] 


12 


7 33 


3 53 


4 38 


9 


B 


Atair south 6 45 


6 21 


5 39 


12 


617|V:J 4 


8 30 


4 49 


4 01 


10 


2 


b 2 d d 


6 22 


5 38 


12 


6 39' 14 


9 27 


5 42 


5 22 


11 


3 




6 23 


5 37 


13 


7 2: 26 


10 27 


6 31 


6 9 


12 


4 




6 24 


5 36 


13 


7 2-l.;c2J^ sill 29 


7 18 


7 2 


13 


5 


% south 5 36 


6 25 


S'oS 


13 


7 47| 20 


morn. 


8 


8 20 


14 


6 




6 26 


5 34 


13 


8 9^^ 2 


1 33 


8 41 


9 49 


15 


7 


C in apogee. 


6 27 


5 2>o 


14 


832 


14 


2 40 


9 21 


11 


16 


B 




6 28 


5 32 


14 


8 54 


25 


3 45 


10 1 


1157 


17 


2 


Antares south 3 51 


6 29 


5 31 


14 


916CY3 7 


4 50 


10 42 


ev.40 


18 


3 




6 30 


5 30 


14 


9 38 19 


5 55 


11 25 


1 11 


19 


4 




6 33 


5 27 


14 


10 0^ 2 


rises. 


morn. 


146 


20 


5 


^ stationary. 


6 34 


5 26 


15 


1021 14 


5 30 


10 


2 14 


21 


6 


Sirius rises 11 52 


6 .35 


5 25 


15 


10 43 27 


6 19 


58 


2 43 


22 


7 




^o^ 


5 24 


15 


11 4n 9 


7 14 


1 49 


3 14 


23 


B 


\ sets 9 15 


6 o7 


5 23 


15 


1125 


22 


8 10 


2 42 


3 49 


24 


2 


§ rises 10 24 


6 38 


5 22 


15 


1147 


95 5 


9 6 


3 38 


4 27 


25 


3 




6 40 


5 20 


15 


12 7 


19 


10 14 


4 34 


5 10 


26 


4 




6 41 


5 19 


15 


12 28 


SI 2 


11 19 


5 29 


5 57 


27 


5 




6 42 


5 18 


16 


12 48 


16 


morn. 


6 23 


6 58 


28 


6 


Atair sets 12 02 


6 43 


5 17 


16 


13 9 


30 


1 17 


7 15 


8 19 


29 


7 


Fomalhaut s. 8 29 


6 45 


5 15 


16 


13 29rTp, 5 


2 32 


8 5 


9 39 


30 


B 


% 6 (L 


6 46 


5 14 


16 


13 49 20 


3 37 


8 56 


10 55 


311 2 


^ (4 0— (Tinperig. 


6 47 


5 1316 


14 8-i.l5 


4 42 


9 48 


1150 



It is common to overlook what is near, by keeping the eye 
fixed on something remote. In the same manner present op- 
portunities are neglected, and attainable good is slighted by 
minds busied in extensive ranges, and intent upon future ad- 
vantages. Life, however short, is made shorter by waste of 
time ; and its progress towards happiness, though naturally 
slow, is made still slower, by unnecessary labour. 

The indiscretion of a foolish man is more to be feared, than 
his friendship valued. 



ELEVENTH MONTH. 



1842. 



MOON'S PHASES. 


r. H. M. 




D. H. M. 


New # 2 11 3 Morn. 


Full 1^ 10 25 Aft. 


First 3 9 8 10 Aft. 


Last a 25 3 55 Morn. 


^p 




Sun Sun j 


Q.Sun's D's 


D 


i) 


High 


Remarks. ' 


rises 


sets. 


fsl'decl. pla. 


rises 


^outh 


water 


cid 




1. m. 


h. m. 


n). 'south, s. d 

1614 281^29 


ii. m. 


h. m. 


Phiia. 


1 3 


5 in^ j 


6 48 


5 12 


5 43 


10 42 


morn. 


2 4 




6 49 


5 1116ll4 46n\,l4 


sets. 


11 37 


1 29 


3: 5 


9 rises 10 20 


6 50 


5 10'l6'l5 5! 2c 


5 40 


aft. 37 


2 14 


4 6 


'^ in aphelion. 


6 51 


5 9jl615 24 


/12 


6 18 


1 36 


2 58 


5 7 


2) runs low. 


6 53 


5 71615 42 


26 


7 7 


2 35 


3 39 


6B 


^ in perihelion. 


6 54 


5 6'1616 


V^ 9 


7 57 


3 31 


4 22 


7| 2 


7*s south 34 


6 55 5 51616 18 


22 


8 57 


4 23 


4 43 


S! 3 


^ stationary. 


6 56 5 41616 36'-? 4 


10 02 


5 11 


5 3 


9' 4 




6 56 


5 41616 531 16 


11 5 


5 57 


5 48 


10 5 


7*s south 12 33 


6 57 


5 3[15'l7 10i 28 


morn. 


6 38 


6 38 


11 


6 


% south 8 44 


6 58 


5 2I15 17 27X10 


1 20 


7 18 


7 39 


12 


7 


([; in apogee. 


6 59 


5 lll5'l7 43| 22 


2 30 


7 58 


8 48 


13 B 




7 1 


4 59il5:i8 0^ 4 


3 43 


8 39 


9 54 


14 


2 


Regulus rises 12 00 


7 2 


4 58 15 18 15' 16 


4 54 


9 21 


10 56 


15 


3 


Orion rises 7 58 


7 3 


4 5715.18 311 28 


5 55 


10 5 


n 49 


16 


4 


^ 's gr. elongation. 


7 4 


4 56:15 18 46^10 


6 55 


10 53 


ev. 29 


17 


5 




7 5 


4 551419 1' 23 


rises. 


11 53 


1 6 


18 


6 


\l sets 7 41 


7 6 


4 5411419 16 n 6 


6 28 


morn. 


1 41 


19 


7 


X) runs high. 


7 7 


4 53'l4il9 29 19 


7 16 


37 


2 19 


20 


R 


:^ sets 8 14 


7 8 


4 52 


14194303 2 


8 11 


1 33 


2 57 


21 


'^ 


Regulus rises 11 31 


7 9 


4 51 


1319 56 16 


9 6 


2 30 


3 35 


22 


3 


Q enters / 


7 9 


4 51 


13:20 9' 29 


10 12 


3 26 


4 18 


23 


4 


Antares south 12 25 


7 10 


4 50113 20 22 Q 13 


11 17 


4 19 


5 2 


24 


5 


Sirius rises 9 28 


7 11 


4 49'13 20 34! 27 


morn 


5 11 


5 55 


25 


6 

7 




7 11 


4 49 12 20 47 


^11 


16 


6 1 


6 51 


26 


i 


7 12 


4 48112 20 58 


25 


1 23 


6 50 


7 54 


27 B 


C in perigee. 


7 12 


4 48'l2;21 9 


-blO 


2 31 


7 39 


9 4 


28 2 


% 6(L 


|7 13 


4 471112120 


24 


3 37 


8 30 


10 14 


29 3 


Vega south 2 11 


7 14|4 46;ilj2130 


nv 8 


\ 4 43 


9 24 


11 18 


30 4 


9 6 d 


7 15'4 45IIOI2I 40 


23 


' 5 47 


10 20 


morn. 



The hollowest heart can be content to follow one that pros- 
pereth. Adversity is the only furnace of friendship. If love 
will not abide both fire and anvil, it is counterfeit ; so, in our 
love to God, we do but crack and vaunt in vain, if we cannot 
be willing to suffer for him. 

Sensible fear and love of God, or dread of his displeasure, 
and an habitual, steady resolution to secure his favour, is the 
work and proof of regeneration by a divine power, for natu- 
rally we neither have this disposition, nor ability to acquire it. 



1842. 



TWELFTH MONTH. 











MOON'S PHASES 


, 














B. 


H. 


M. 






D. 


n. 


M. 




New 


• 


1 


11 


lU Aft. 


Last 


(T 


24 


11 


41 


Morn 


First 


7> 


9 


5 


20 Aft. 


New 


m 


31 


1 


58 


Aft. 


Full 


O 


17 


1 


42 Aft. 















^ 


^ 




Sun 


Sun 


O 


bun^ 


J)'« 


3 


D 


High 




Remarks. 


rises 


sets. 


fst 


decl. 


pla. 


rises. 


south. 


water 


P 


S 




h. m. 


h. m. 


m. 


south. 


S. d. 


h. m. 


h. m 


Phila. 


1 


5 




7 15 


4 45 


T0'2r4"9 


/ 7 


sets. 


11 19 


1 11 


2 


6 


5) runs low. 


7 15 


4 45 


1021 58 


20 


4 52 


aft. 17 


2 1 


3 


7 




7 16 


4 44 


10122 7 


Vj 4 


5 54 


1 16 


2 44 


4 


B 


h (5 C 


7 16 


4 44 


9122 15 


17 


6 44 


2 1 


3 25 


5 


2 


^ <5 3 


7 17 


4 43 


9 22 23 


29 


7 56 


3 1 


4 6 


6 


3 


7*s south 10 48 


7 17 


4 43 


8^22 31 


C5J12 


8 57 


3 49 


4 43 


7 


4 


Altair south 2 50 


7 18|4 42 


8 22 38 


24 


9 57 


4 32 


5 1 


8 


o 


Sirius rises 8 36 


7 18 4 42 


7 22 44 


X ^3 


10 57 


5 14 


5 23 


9 


6 




7 18 4 42 


7 22 50 


18 


11 54 


5 54 


6 4 


10 


7 


C in apogee. 


7 19 4 41 


7 23 56 


^ 


morn. 


6 34 


6 54 


11 


B 




7 2014 40 


623 1 


12 


51 


7 15 


7 39 


12 


2 


;5)'s lat. 5 deg-. north. 


7 20 


4 40 


623 6 


24 


1 50 


7 58 


8 34 


13 


o 


Ij sotitli I 31 


7 20 


4 40 


5123 10 


« 6 


2 49 


8 44 


9 36 


14 


4 


2/ soutli 2 16 


7 20 


4 40 


5123 14 


19 


3 48 


9 33 


10 38 


15 


5 


Vega south 1 01 


7 21 


4 39 


4'23 18 


n 1 


4 49 


10 26 


11 40 


16 


6 


% sets 12 19 


7 21 


4 39 


4j23 19 


15 


5 52 


11 23 


ev. 34 


17 


7 


^ □ 


7 22 


4 38 


3 23 22 


28 


rises. 


morn. 


I 18 


18 


B 


9 in inf. (^ Q "ear ® 


7 22 


4 38 


3|23 24 


gBl2 


6 43 


20 


2 3 


19 


2 




7 22 


4 38 


2! 23 25 


26 


7 45 


1 18 


2 45 


20 


3 


^ in aphelion. 


7 22 


4 38 


2:23 26 


SllO 


8 25 


2 14 


3 28 


21 


4 


enters VJ 


7 22 


4 38 


123 27 


24 


9 26 


3 7 


4 10 


22 


5 


]) in perigee. 


7 22 


4 38 


123 27 


^ 8 


10 26 


3 58 

4 48 


4 53 


23 


6 


^ rises 2 05 


7 22 


4 38 


0i23 26 


22 


11 25 


5 37 


24 


7 


Spica rises 1 40 


7 22 


4 38 


0)'23 25 


d:^ 6 


morn. 


5 37 


6 29 


25 


B 


Frocyon south 1 16 


7 22 


4 38 


si. 


23 23 


20 


1 6 


6 26 


7 20 


26 


2 


% 6 a 


7 22 


4 38 





23 21 


ni 4 


2 10 


7 17 


8 16 


27 


3 


Atuir sets 7 50 


7 21 


4 39 


1 


23 19 


18 


3 16 


8 12 


9 30 


28 


4 


^ superior c5 


7 21 


4 39 


1 


23 15 


/ 2 


4 21 


9 7 


10 53 


29 


5 


2) runs low. 


7 21 


4 39 


2 


23 12 


16 


5 25 


10 5 


morn. 


30 


6 




7 20 4 40 


2 


23 9 


29 


6 28 


11 3 


1 2 


31 


7 


eclipsed, invisible. 


7 20 4 40 


3 


23 8 


1^12 


sets. 


11 52 


1 50 



The expressions of a truly humble and sincere Christian 
will always be below rather than above his feelings. He will 
tremble when he perceives the estimation in which he is held, 
lest, inadvertently, he has made professions that have tran- 
scended the reality. 

What man can say of the years to come. Thus I will be ! 
How justly do we contemn this uncertainty, and look up to those 
riches that cannot but endure when heaven and earth are dis- 
solved. 



MEMOIR OF SAMUEL W. CLARKE. 

"Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings, thou hast perfected praise' 

In the early part of the year 1815, there died at 
Greenwich, Rhode Island, Samuel W. Clarke, a youth 
who had then just completed his ninth year. He was 
born in the twelfth month, 1805, and for the first six years 
of his life, there does not appear to have been anything 
extrordinary in his conduct or disposition, except his 
strong attachment to the society of those who were far 
advanced in life. As his character developed, he appeared 
very tender in his feelings, mild in his temper, and affec- 
tionate in his disposition ; whilst the quickness of his ap- 
prehension, the accuracy of his observation, and retentive- 
ness of his memory, gave rich promise of future usefulness. 
When he was about seven years of age, his mind experi- 
enced a remarkable visitation of heavenly love, and sub- 
mitting thereto, he not only witnessed the purifying ope- 
rations of the Holy Spirit, but was instructed thereby in 
the mysteries of the Gospel of Christ. His mother, about 
the same period of time, had been brought under religious 
feelings, and was anxious to fulfil her duties to her chil- 
dren, being mainly desirous that they might become lambs 
of that fold, whose tender Shepherd laid down his life for 
the sheep. She has left a short account of her son, in 
which, after speaking of the sublime doctrines of Chris- 
tianity, she says, " Our dear son Samuel seemed earnestly 
engaged on these subjects ; his mind was in a most extra- 
ordinary manner illuminated and absorbed in these great 
truths, and his conversation being clear, connected and 
fluent, surprised us all. He addressed himself to old and 
young, to the servants as well as his companions ; insist- 
ing, usually, on obedience to our heavenly Father, and 
love to his Son, as the only foundation for happiness here- 
after ; and painting in the language of the Scriptures, the 
dreadful state of those who were disobedient." 

Whilst on a visit at the house of an uncle, he met with 
an elderly coloured woman, whom he wished much to 
teach to read the Bible, but finding that a task he could 
not accomplish, he had frequent religious conversations 
with her, in which he was enabled to minister to her in- 
struction and comfort. His aunt, who was present on 
some of these opportunities, and who we are informed, was 

C 



herself much benefitted thereby, mentioned to his mother 
the great alteration which had taken place in his conver- 
sation, and her surprise at the piety and fervour he 
evinced, so uncommon in one of his age. She added, that 
the old coloured woman had said, " he would not live long, 
for he was already God's child." 

His mother attended at the congregational place of 
worship, and during the time of her increasing concern 
on religious subjects, she joined herself in membership 
thereto. Samuel's mind was however, otherwise drawn ; 
and he expressed a desire that he might be permitted to 
go to the meetings of the Society of Friends. His mother 
consented that he should make a trial, and from that time 
he became a constant attender of them, forming an ac- 
quaintance amongst the members, and becoming much 
attached to some of the aged ones. Being desirous of 
attending week-day meetings, an arrangement was made 
with his teacher, who dismissed him from school at the 
proper time. 

He soon after applied for permission to sit in those 
meetings which were held for discipline, and the Monthly 
Meeting granted his request. His mother says, " I have 
noticed with surprise, that my dear boy returned from 
these meetings, which lasted from eleven till three or four 
o'clock, without the least appearance of fatigue, disgust, 
or hunger. The discipline of the Quaker church, was 
now a matter of deep interest to him. He wished to dress 
in their manner and use their language ; desiring me to 
excuse him from the usual forms of address which have 
obtained currency in the world. I acceded to this, as 
well as all other of his wishes connected with his profes- 
sion, believing I had no right to interfere in regulating a 
mind, so manifestly taught by the Spirit of God. The 
dear boy requested me to say grace in my heart before 
meals ; mentioning his own wish and intention of giving 
the Lord thanks always, and desiring I would prevail on 
his uncle and aunt to join us. 

" His sisters were baptized ; I left him at liberty to 
make his choice ; he refused to join them, saying, he be- 
lieved but in one baptism, that of the Spirit. Our town 
was very sickly last winter, and the many deaths made a 
deep impression on his mind. He often remarked, so- 
lemnly, on the uncertainty of our existence, and the ne- 
cessity for a due preparation for death. He was in the 



constant habit of drawing matter for the improvement of 
the heart and life, from many striking, or to him, interest- 
ing occurrences. The great and essential doctrines of 
rehgion were made plain to his understanding, and he 
could give as good a reason for the hope within him, as 
most of those who had twice his years." 

It was his practice on the first-day of the week, in the 
afternoon, to get his sisters to meet and sit down in silence 
with him, and on these occasions he sometimes spoke in 
the way of exhortation, and sometimes of prayer. Of 
his offering in the way of supplication, his mother says, 
" his manner was devout, and his matter that of a mind 
more exercised regarding the state of the soul after death, 
and the spirituality and the glory of our heavenly Fa- 
ther's existence, than most would have believed possible 
in one so young. And now in the midst of all our hopes, 
spiritual and temporal, for surely a child could scarcely 
promise more, God saw fit to remove him from us, and to 
take him to himself. I had fondly anticipated a youth, 
not of levity, folly, and transgression, but full of peace 
and piety; which instead of trying our heart by its wan- 
derings, should edify by its purity. I had looked forward 
to the time, and many of those who knew him indulged 
the same hope, of his being a teacher and a pillar in the 
church of our blessed Lord. He was now nine years old. 
Eight days of sickness and anguish severed him from our 
arms forever." 



A tender conscience is an inestimable blessing ; that is, 
a conscience not only quick to discern what is evil, but 
instantly to shun it, as the eyelid closes itself against a 
moat. 



"THEY THAT SEEK ME EARLY, SHALL 
FIND ME." 

Come, while the blossoms of thy years are brightest, 
Thou youthful wanderer in a flowery maze, 

Come, while the restless heart is bounding lightest. 
And joy's pure sun-beams tremble in thy ways ; 



Come, while sweet thoughts, like summer buds unfolding, 
Waken rich feelings in the careless breast ; 

While yet thy hand the ephemeral wreath is holding, 
Come, and secure interminable rest. 

Soon will the freshness of thy days be over, 

And thy free buoyancy of soul be flown ; 
Pleasure will fold her wing, and friend and lover 

Will to the embraces of the worm have gone ! 
Those who now bless thee will have past forever ; 

Their looks of kindness will be lost to thee — 
Thou wilt need balm to heal thy spirits' fever, 

As thy sick heart broods over years to be ! 

Come, while the morning of thy life is glowing, 

Ere the dim phantoms thou art chasing die — 
Ere the gay spell which earth is round thee throwing, 

Fades like the crimson from a sun-set sky — 
Life is but shadows, save a promise given. 

Which lights up sorrow with a fadeless ray — 
Oh, — touch the sceptre — win a hope in heaven, 

Come, turn thy spirit from the world away. 

Then will the crosses of this brief existence, 

Seem airy nothings to thy ardent soul — 
And shining brightly in the forward distance, 

Will of thy patient race, appear the goal ; 
Home of the weary ; where in peace reposing, 

The spirit lingers in unclouded bliss> 
Though o'er its dust the curtained grave is closing — 

Who would not, early^ choose a lot like this ! 



ANECDOTE OF JOHN NEWTON. 

During the time that John Newton, afterwards so well 
known for his piety, was the mate of a ship on the coast 
of Guinea, and about to sail to the West Indies, it was 
his custom, while the ship was at anchor off Rio Cestors. 
to go up the river in the afternoon with the sea-breeze, to 
procure his lading in the evening, in order to return on 
board with the land wind in the morning. In a boat 
which had been so long in service, that it was almost unfit 



for use, he had made several of these little voyages. Hav- 
ing' dined on board, he was preparing to return to the 
river as formerly — had taken leave of the captain, and was 
in the act of pushing off from the ship. A^ this instant 
the captain came up from the cabin, and called him agaiji 
on board. John Newton immediately obeyed, upon the 
supposition that there were some further orders to receive. 
The captain, however, said, that he had taken it into his 
head, as he termed it, that his mate should remain that 
day on board, and that another man should go in his room. 
When the captain's reason for this strange proceeding was 
inquired, none was assigned, but that he had taken it into 
his head. The boat went, but it returned no more; it 
sunk that night in the river, and the person officiating in 
the place of John Newton was drowned. When the in- 
telligence was received on board the next morning, the 
captain, though otherwise, and especially upon religious 
subjects, a person of much insensibility, was very consi- 
derably affected, and declared that he had no other reason 
for cwmtermanding John Newton, but a sudden and inde- 
finable impulse to detain him. 



TIME IS PRECIOUS. 

The Lord has given us time and space, if we will 
rightly employ it, both to provide for the body, and pre- 
pare for eternity ; and he will assuredly require from us 
an account of the manner in which that time has been 
rspent ; which, in his all-wise economy, he has taught us 
to prize by giving us but one moment at once. That 
which is past, is gone for ever; and that which is to come, 
may not come to its. The present time only is ours: and 
we are enjoined to icalk circumspectly , redeeming the 
time ; and to work out our own salvation with fear and 
trembling. 



AN INDIAN'S DEFINITION OF RELIGION. 

Given to Anthony Benezet, Teacher, in Philadelphia. 

When a pious Indian, who laboured to bring his country 
people to a sense of good, was asked what he meant b)' 
the religion he wanted to promote, he answered, " 3Iv 
C 2 



brother, I was made sensible that my heart was hard and 
bad : under this sense I cried to the Great Spirit, who 
made the heart. The water ran long (some years) from 
mine eyes, till at length I felt that my heart was changed ; 
that it was become soft and good. I thought myself 
-raised, as it were, above the world ; that I was in such a 
disposition, that I loved every man, and could bear without 
anger anything from any of my fellow-creatures, from a 
sense that anything wrong in them, proceeded only from 
that same badness of heart I had too long groaned under." 
This, the Indian said, was what he called religion, and 
what he was concerned to exhort his brethren to seek the 
experience of. 



THE TEACHING OF THE SPIRIT. 

I. They who truly fear God, have a secret guidance from 
a higher wisdom than what is barely human, namely, the 
Spirit of Truth and goodness ; which does really, though 
secretly, prevent and direct them. Any man that sin- 
cerely and truly fears Almighty God, and calls and relies 
upon him for his direction, has it as really, as a son has 
the counsel and direction of his father ; and though the 
voice be not audible nor discernible by sense, yet it is 
equally as real as if a man heard a voice, saying, This is 
the way ivalk in it. 

Though this secret direction of Almighty God is prin- 
cipally seen, in matters relating to the good of the soul : 
yet even in the concerns of this life, a good man fearing 
God, and begging his direction, will very often, if not at 
all times, find it. I can call my own experience to wit- 
ness, that, even in the temporal affairs of my whole life, I 
have never been disappointed of the best direction, when 
I have, in humility and sincerity implored it. 

The observance of the secret admonition of this Spirit 
of God in the heart, is an effectual means to cleanse and 
sanctify us ; and the more it is attended to, the more it 
will be conversant with our souls, for our instruction. In 
the midst of difficulties, it will be our counsellor; in the 
midst of temptations, it will be our strength, and grace 
sufficient for us ; in the midst of troubles, it will be our 
light and our comforter. 

It is impossible for us to enjoy the influence of this good 



Spirit, till we are deeply sensible of our own emptiness 
and nothingness, and our minds are thereby brought down 
and laid in the dust. The Spirit of Christ is indeed a 
humbling spirit ; the more we have of it the tnore we 
shall be humbled ; and it is a sign that either we have it 
not, or that it is yet overpowered by our corruptions, if 
our heart be still haughty. 

Attend, therefore, to the secret persuasions and dissua- 
sions of the Spirit of God^ and beware of quenching or 
grieving it. This wind that blows where it lists, if shut 
out or resisted, may never breathe upon us again, but 
leave us to be hardened in our sins. If observed and 
obeyed, it will on all occasions be our monitor and director. 
When we go. out, it will lead us; when vve sleeps it will 
keep us; and when we awake, it will talk with us. These 
are faithful, weighty, and true sayings — happy are those 
that svitness them so to be. — Matthew Hale. 



PROVIDENTIAL OCCURRENCE. 

Towards the close of the last century, a circumstance 
occurred in New England, which excited considerable at- 
tention at the time, and which was attended with the most 
happy consequences. 

A young female, devotedly attached to dissipation and 
amusement, was under the necessity of repairing to the 

town of R J which was but at a short distance from 

that in which she resided ; and to beguile the tedium of 
the journey, she took with her a young female, who had 
never been from home before. Travelling on horseback, 
they came to the brink of a considerable river, which was 
only fordable when its waters were diminished by a lono 
period of heat and drought. With foolish levity, desirous 
of at once displaying her own horsemanship, and of trying 
the courage of her companion, she urged her horse into 
the stream, but with the full intention of returning after 
having proceeded a few yards from the shore. When. 
however, she saw that her companion followed her with- 
^out hesitation, and supposing from the appearance of the 
water that they would be able to effect their passage with- 
out either ditficulty or damage, she proceeded ; her head 
becoming giddy from gazing on the motion of the stream, 
she directed her horse in a wrong direction ; and the ani- 



mal stumbling upon a rock which was covered by tjie 
water, plunged her beneath the waves. By a strong and 
convulsive exertion, she once raised her head above the 
water, but her clothes being wet and heavy, she soon sunk 
again, and was quickly carried down the Hver by the force 
of the current. 

But she was not abandoned by the mercy and providence 
of God. A person who was occupied in his agricultural 
concerns upon his own farni, at some distance, felt an ex- 
traordinary impression upon his mind that he must in- 
stantly go to the town of R . Having no possible 

object that could be answered by the journey, he dismissed 
the impulse at once ,' it proved, however, too powerful to 
be resisted ; he mounted his horse and proceeded on his 
way. He had not gone far, when he perceived a neigh- 
bour of his commencing a journey in the same direction ; 

he inquired whither he was going ; " To R ,'■ was the 

reply. "Had he any particular business there?" "No; 
he had felt a strong and unaccountai)le inclination to visit 
the place, and that was his only reason for leaving his 
home." 

They arrived at the river which has already been men- 
tioned, and they found the water so high that they gave 
up the idea of lording it ; when, however, they perceived 
the two friends making the attempt, they followed them 
in, and were spectators of all that happened. They had 
almost reached the opposite bank, when they saw the 
young woman fall into the river, and the man who was 
nearest to the shore, rode as rapidly as he could down the 
stream, hoping to overtake her, and to effect her deliver- 
ance from a watery grave. When he arrived at the place 
where she was, still under water, her hand involuntarily 
caught fast hold of the leg of his horse, which, though, 
as the owner affirmed, was a remarkable skittish animal, 
on this occasion, instead of kicking and plunging with the 
fright, stood perfectly still. The other man, perceiving 
that his companion was in need of assistance, sprung from 
his horse, waded into the river, and soon brought the body 
to the shore. Carrying her to a house which stood in the 
vicinity of the ford, they committed her to the care of -fi 
prudent and benevolent female, whose skilful and timely 
exertions soon effected her restoration to life. The other 
female, who had retained her seat, was in transjwrts of 
joy at the recovery of her friend. The men then related 



the very extraordinary impressions which had brought 
them to the spot, and saying to each other, " We now 
know what our business was at R to-day," they re- 
turned immediately to their homes. 

When the female arrived at her own house, she was 
soon visited by a young man, as gay, as thoughtless, and 
as frivolous as she had been, who accosted her in bis usual 
light and trifling manner, and commenced his intended 
observations upon the occurrence, by saying, " I perceive 
you have met with a misfortune." She interrupted him. 
by saying with great seriousness, " I have experienced a 
very remarkable providence of God ;" and in the same 
spirit she proceeded to narrate the circumstances of her 
danger and deliverance. 

That danger produced an effect which never afterwards 
was effaced. She abandoned her previous course — she 
gave herself up to that God who had saved her from de- 
struction, and became the humble and devoted disciple of 
that Redeemer, who can rescue from the miseries of ever- 
lasting destruction, as well as from the perils which endan- 
ger the life of the body. 

The young man, too, was thereby induced to ponder 
upon his conduct and character; he abandoned his dissi- 
pated connections. Through the merciful guidance of the 
Holy Spirit, he was enabled to flee to the refuge from the 
wrath to come. It was from him that the narrative of 
this very interesting occurrence was obtained. 

i,r- Wiii^Wli 5C:^ 

THE DAISY. '' 

Not worlds on worlds in phalanx deep, 

Need we to prove a God is here. 
The daisy, fresh from winter's sleep, 

Tells of his hand in lines as clear. 

For who but He who arched the skies, 
And pours the day spring's living flood : 

Wondrous alike in all he tries. 

Could rear the daisy's purple bud : 

Mould its green cup, its wiry ste m 

Its fringed border nicely spin : 
And cut the gold embossed gem, 

That set in silver gleams within ; 



And fling it unrestrained and free, 
O'er hill and dale, and desert sod ; 

That man, where'er he walks may see, 
In every step, the stamp of God. 



CHRISTIAN ZEAL. 

It is commonly said that no great reformation can be 
wrought but bj^ excitement and vehemence ; that the zeal 
which dares everything, is the only power to oppose to 
long-rooted abuses. But it is not true that God has com- 
mitted the great work of reforming the world, to passion. 
Zeal is a minister of good only, when it gives energy to 
the intellect, and allies itself v/ith wisdom. r 

One great principle, which we should lay down as im- 
moveably true, is, that if a good work cannot b0 carried 
on by the calm, self-controlled, benevolent spirit of Chris- 
tianity, then the time for doing it has not come. God 
asks not the aid of our vices. He can overrule them for 
good, but they are not the chosen instruments of human 
happiness. 

We, indeed, need zeal, fervent zeal, such as will fear 
no man's power, and shrink before no man's frown ; such 
as will sacrifice life to truth and freedom. But it should 
be joined with deliberate wisdom and universal charity. 
It ought to regard the whole, in its strenuous efforts for a 
part. Above all, it ought to ask first, not what means are 
most effectual, but what means are sanctioned by the moral 
law, and by Christian love. We ought to think much 
more of walking in the right path, than of reaching our 
end. We should desire virtue more than success, which 
was reserved for other times and other hands. The first 
object of a true zeal is, not that we may prosper, but that 
we may do right — that we may keep ourselves unspotted 
from every evil thought, word and deed. Under the influ- 
ence of such a 'zeal, we shall not find in the greatness of 
an enterprise, an apology for intrigue or for violence. We 
shall not need immediate success to spur us to exertion. 
We shall not distrust God, because he does not yield to 
the cry of human impatience. We shall not forsake a 
good work, because it does not advance with a rapid step. 
Faith in truth, virtue and Almighty goodness, will save us 
alike from rashness and despair. 



THE CONVERTED JEW. 

It is sometimes said, that the conversion of a Jew is 
more hopeless than that of any other individual. On this 
account the reader will be pleased with the following ex- 
traordinary account of the providential deliverance of a 
Jew from the errors of his unbelieving countrymen, which 
is related by an individual who travelled through the west- 
ern part of Virginia, in the United States. He writes as 
follows : — 

" I was much interested in hearing an old and highly 
respectable clergyman, give a short account of a Jew with 
whom he had lately become acquainted. He was preach- 
ing to a large and attentive audience, when his attention 
was arrested, by seeing a man enter, having every mark 
of a Jew in the lineaments of his countenance. He was 
well dressed, and his countenance was noble, though it was 
evident his heart had lately been the habitation of sorrow. 
He took his seat, and was all attention ; while an uncon- 
scious tear was often seen to wet his manly cheek. After 
service, the clergyman fixed his eye steadily upon him; 
and the stranger reciprocated the stare. The good min- 
ister went up t-^ him, and said, ' Am I correct 1 am I not 
addressing one of the children of Abraham?' '■ You are.' 
' But how is it that I meet a Jew in a Christian assembly ?' 
The substance of his narrative was this. It appeared that 
he was a very respectable man, of superior education, who 
had lately come from London, and with his books, his 
riches, and a lovely daughter of seventeen, he had found 
a charming retreat on the fertile banks of Ohio. He had 
buried the companion of his bosom before he left Eng- 
land : and he knew no pleasure but the company of his 
endeared child. She was, indeed, worthy of a parent's 
love. She was surrounded by beauty as a mantle ; but 
her cultivated mind, and her amiable disposition, threw 
around her a charm superior to any tinselled decorations 
of body. No pains had been spared in her education : she 
could read and speak with fluency several different lan- 
guages, and her manners charmed every beholder. No 
wonder, then, that a doting father, whose head had now 
become sprinkled with grey, should place his whole aflfec- 
tions on this only child of his love ; especially as he knew 
no source of happiness beyond this world. Being a strict 
Jew, he educated her in the strictest principles of her re- 



ligion ; and he thought her an ornament to her profession. 
Not long since, his daughter was taken sick : the rose 
faded from her cheek; her eye lost its fire, and her 
strength decayed. The father hung over the bed of his 
daughter with a heart ready to burst with anguish. He 
often attempted to converse with her, but seldom spoke 
but by the language of tears. He spared no trouble nor 
expense in procurinor medical assistance; but no human 
skill could avail. The father was walking in a small 
grove near the house, wetting his steps with his tears, 
when he was sent for by his dying daughter. With a 
heavy heart he entered the door of her chamber, to take 
a last farewell of his child ; and his religion gave but a 
teeble hope of meeting her hereafter. The child grasped 
the hand of her parent, 'My father, do you love me?' 
' My child, you know I love you ; that you are more dear 
to me than the whole world besides.' * But, father, do 
you love me?' ' Why, my child, will you give me pain so 
exquisite ? Have I never given you any proof of my love V 
' But, my dearest father, do you love me V The father 
could not answer. The child added, ' I know, my dear 
father, you have ever loved me ; you have been the kind- 
est of parents, and I tenderly love you : v/ill you grant me 
one request ? O, my father, it is the dying request of your 
daughter: will you grant it?' 'My dearest child, ask what 
you will, though it take every cent of my property, what- 
ever it may be, it shall be granted ; I will grant it.' ' Then, 
my dear father, I beg you will never again speak against 
Jesus of Nazareth !' The father was dumb with astonish- 
ment. 'I know,' continued the dying girl, 'I know but 
little about this Jesus, for I was never taught. But 1 know 
that he is a Saviour ; for he has manifested himself to me 
gince I have been sick, even for the salvation of my soul. 
I believe he will save me, although I have never before 
loved him. I feel that I am going to him. And now, my 
dear father, do not deny me : I beg that you will never 
again speak against this Jesus of Nazareth ! I entreat you 
CO obtain a New Testament ; that tells of him ; and I pray 
you may know him, and when I am no more, you may 
bestow on him that love that was formerly mine !' The 
exertion here overcame the weakness of her feeble body. 
She stopped ; and the father's heart was too full even for 
tears. He left the room in great horror of mind ; and 
ere he could again summon sufficient fortitude, the spirit 



of his accomplished daughter had taken its flight, as I 
trust, to that Saviour whom she loved and honoured. The 
first thing the parent did, after committing to the earth 
his last earthly joy, was to procure a New Testament. 
This he read ; and, taught by the Spirit from above, he is 
now numbered among the meek and humble followers 
of the Lamb- 



CHILDREN. 

The minds of our children were made to be instructed 
in regard to their duty, and to be influenced by proper 
motives when clearly and properly presented. 1 hold it 
to be the duty of every parent to explain the reasons of 
his requirements, as far and as fast as his children become 
capable of comprehending them. I know that where 
there is a large family, it requires a great deal of time 
and patience, perhaps more than we know how to afford, 
to give a reason for every thing ; but though it may be 
very inconvenient at first, there will be a clear saving of 
time in the end. With few exceptions, children soon learn 
to acquiesce in the judgment of their parents, when the 
grounds of that judgment are briefly or more fully stated, 
as occasion may require. 

Yet, while I strenuously insist on the duty of giving 
reasons in the administration of family government, I am 
aware there may be cases, in which from prudential mo- 
lives, they should be withheld, at least for a time. And 
it is more than possible, that when the hearts of our chil- 
dren are greatly set upon improper indulgence, they will 
not be convinced by any arguments which we can use, to 
dissuade them. In such cases, if our reasons are good, 
the fault is with them ; and at any rate, we are to be the 
judges in the last resort, and not they. If I cannot con- 
vince my child that the gratification of his desires would 
be injurious, or wrong, when I am sure it would, I must 
interpose ray authority to restrain him. But if parents 
were to make it a fixed principle to " show cause," where 
it can be done, in the exercise of the authority with which 
God has clothed them, it would be communicating a vast 
amount of instruction to their children, on a thousand 
practical questions of the greatest moment, and would go 
very far towards securing the most prompt and cheerful 
D 



obedience. Equally important is it, that parents should 
enlist the consciences of their children, to secure a ready 
obedience. Indeed, till you reach the conscience, you 
have done but little to bind your child to his duty. Com- 
mand your child, and if he sees you are in earnest, he 
will probably obey you. Show him the reason of the 
command, and he will yield more cheerfully. Appeal to 
his conscience, get that enlisted on your side, and you 
have a hold upon him which you never had before. You 
have gained an auxiliary that will sometimes help you, 
even when you are asleep yourselves. 

Having once gained the conscience of a child, his heart 
will yield almost as a matter of course; and this is incom- 
parably the sweetest control that a parent can establish in 
his family. Let him reign in the hearts of his children, 
that is, let their obedience be prompted by filial affection, 
and what can he wish for more 1 This is the law of love, 
which is paramount to every other law, and without which, 
family government must be essentially defective. With 
it, the fire-side is the dearest spot on earth. There is no 
constraint like that of love. 



THE SPIRIT OF PEACE. 

There are many instances on record, of the restraining 
influence which a peaceable deportment has exerted over 
violent men. The following is one which occurred a few 
years ago in South Africa, and is related on the authority 
of a member of the Society of Friends, who knew the 
individual spoken of, Richard Gush, a pious man. 

In the late Caffre war, he objected to take up arms, and 
also to leave his own house and go to Graham's-town, as 
most of the other inhabitants had done, but which ap- 
peared to him to imply a want of trust in God, and a 
leaning rather upon human help. On about three hundred 
Caffres appearing in the neighbourhood, he thought it his 
duty to go to them, notwithstanding the dissuasions of his 
wife and daughter, and accompanied by a person named 
B. Woest, and followed at a distance by his son-in-law and 
another young man, he went on horseback, having first 
put off his coat, that the Caffres might distinctly see that 
he was unarmed ; and in further proof of this, on approach- 
ing them, he and his companion held up their hands, and 



at about one hundred and fifty yards called to them, desir- 
ing that if any one among them could speak the Dutch 
language, he would come down to them with his hands 
also erect. When the CafFres saw that these intrepid 
men were unarmed, their captain and one of his men came 
near. R. Gush then inquired why the Caffreji came to 
steal the cattle of the Salem people, or to burn their village 
and kill their people. Hearing him speak in Dutch, they 
replied, that they were not come to hurt the Dutch, but to 
drive the English into the sea. R. Gush then told them 
that he was an Englishman, that the village before them 
was English, and he asked the one who spoke Dutch, 
" Dost thou know any one amongst the settlers who has 
taken cattle from the CafFres, or done them any harm ?" 
The man replied, "No." Then pointing to the Wesleyan 
mission house, R. Gush told him, that five men had gone 
from that place to teach the Caffres, and pointing to their 
place of worship, he added, "There the inhabitants of 
Salem pray for you, that you may become better men." 
Both the Caffre who spoke Dutch and his captain, stood 
like men ashamed of their conduct ; but said it was hunger 
that drove them out to steal. To this R. Gush answered, 
" You cannot be hungry now, Tcr you have nearly all our 
cattle, amounting to about fourteen, in the bush, behind 
you. The man then said they had no bread. R. Gush 
pointed to the house, at the door of which his wife and 
children were standing, and said, " If you will send one of 
your men, my wife will give him some bread and tobacco, 
and I will stand security for him till he return." The 
man replied, " If you will go yourself and bring it, we 
will go away." R. Gush complied with this request, and 
added some pocket knives to his gift ; and told the captain 
to take some of them to his chief, and tell him that they 
were sent by one who could neither steal cattle nor kill 
his fellow men; but who, with his fellow-settlers, had 
always been the best friends of the Caffres ; and should 
not cease to pray that God would make then^ better men : 
he also expostulated with them, at the same time, on their 
great wickedness. The parties then shook hands, and the 
Caffres went away and were no more seen in the vicinity 
of Salem, which might jv^stly be regarded as given of the 
Lord into the hand of one who dared to trust in him. 



COURAGE. 

Courage, considered in itself, or without reference to its 
object and motives, and regarded in its common manifes- 
tations, is not virtue, is not moral excellence ; and the dis- 
position to exalt it above the spirit of Christianity, is one 
of the most ruinous delusions which have been transmitted 
to us from barbarous times. In most men, courage has its 
origin in a happy organization of the body. It belongs to 
the nerves rather than the character. In some, it is an 
instinct bordering on rashness. In one man it springs 
from strong passions obscuring the idea of danger. In 
another, from want of imagination, or from the incapacity 
of bringing future evils near. The courage of the unedu- 
cated, may often be traced to stupidity ; to the absence of 
thought and sensibility. Many are courageous from the 
dread of the infamy absurdly attached to cowardice. One 
terror expels another. A bullet is less formidable than a 
sneer. To show the moral worthlessness of mere courage, 
of contempt of bodily suffering and pain, one consideration 
is sufficient ; the most abandoned have possessed it in per- 
fection. The villain often hardens into the thorough hero, 
if courage and heroism be one. The more complete his 
success in searing conscience and defying God, the more 
dauntless his daring. Long continued vice and exposure, 
naturally generate contempt of life and a reckless encounter 
of peril. Courage considered in itself, or without refer- 
ence to its causes, is no virtue and deserves no esteem. It 
is found in the best and the worst, and is to be judged 
according to the qualities from which it springs, and with 
which it is conjoined. There is in truth a virtuous, glori- 
ous courage ; but it happens to be found least in those who 
are most admired for bravery. It is the courage of prin- 
ciple, which dares to do right in the face of scorn, which 
puts to hazard reputation, rank, the prospects of advance- 
ment, the sympathy of friends, the admiration of the 
world, rather than violate a conviction of duty. It is the 
courage of benevolence and piety, which counts not life 
dear in withstanding error, superstition, vice, oppression, 
injustice, and the mightiest foes of human improvement 
and happiness. It is the courage of a soul which thirsts 
so intensely for the pure spiritual life, that it can yield up 
the animal life without fear ; in which the vision of moral, 
spiritual, celastial good, has been unfolded so brightly as 



/ 



to obscure all worldly interests ; which aspires after im- 
mortality, and therefore heeds little the pains or pleasures 
of a day ; whose whole power and life has been so con- 
centrated in the love of godlike virtue, that it even finds a 
joy in the perils and sutTerings, by which its loyalty to 
God and virtue may be approved. Can any man, not 
wholly blinded to moral distinctions, compare or confound 
with this Divine energy, the bravery derived from consti- 
tution, nourished by ambition, and blazing out in resent- 
ment, which forms the glory of military men and of men 
of the world 



THE COURAGE OF A CHRISTIAN. 

Basil was assailed by the threatenings and allured by 
the promises of a Roman emperor, to abandon the truth 
of the Gospel. Dignities and riches were offered. 

" Alas !" said the faithful confessor, " These speeches 
are fit to catch little children, who look after such things; 
we are otherwise taught by the sacred Scriptures, and are 
ready to suffer a thousand deaths rather than forsake the 
truth of Christ." 

" Know ye not who we are that command it ?" said the 
praetor. 

" We submit to no one, when they command such things 
as these." 

" Know ye not that we have honours to bestow ?" con- 
tinued the praetor. 

" They," said the confessor, " are but changeable, like 
yourselves." The praetor threatened confiscation, torment, 
banishment, death. 

" As for confiscation, I have nothing to lose ; as for 
banishment, heaven only is my country ; as for torment, 
this body will soon give way ; and as for death, that will 
only set me at liberty." 

" Thou art mad," said the praetor. 

*' I wish I may ever be so mad," said the servant of 
God. His constancy, his courage, his animation, his un- 
daunted attachment to the cause of his heavenly Master, 
affected the minds of those who had brought him before 
their tribunal ; and the Emperor Valens, instead of per- 
sisting in his intimidation, profiered a present, which the 
venerable Christian refused. 



FRUIT OF INFIDELITY. 

David Mallet, a well known cotemporary and tool of the 
infidel Lord Bolingbroke, was himself a virulent propaga- 
tor of unbelief. A man servant of his absconded with a 
considerable quantity of valuable property belonging to 
his master. Being apprehended, he was urged by Mallet 
to confess the reason of his infamous behaviour. " Sir," 
said he, " I have heard you and your friends so often talk 
of the impossibility of a future state, and that after death 
there was no reward for virtue, nor punishment for vice, 
that I was tempted to commit the robbery." "Well," 
replied Mallet, " but had you no fear of that death which 
the laws of your country inflict upon the crime ?" " Sir," 
said the servant, looking sternly at his master, " What is 
that to you, if I had a mind to venture that? you and your 
wicked companions had removed the greater terror, why 
should I fear the less ?" 

KINDNESS TO BRUTES. 

" A righteous man regardeth the life of his beast ; but 
the tender mercies of the wicked are crueL" This pro- 
verb is of old date, but there is nothing truer even at the 
present day. Kind and tender usage to dumb animals is 
one of the most distinguishing qualities of a good man : 
hard-heartedness and cruelty characterize a wicked man. 
There is not an exception to this rule. We can make 
allowance for sudden bursts of passion, or for strong and 
absurd prejudice ; but we may be assured that the habitual 
and cold blooded persecutor of unresisting and defenceless 
animals, is bad at heart. 

It is true that there is no express command enforcing 
the duty of humanity to the inferior creatures, in any part 
of the New Testament, but there is that which is fully to 
the purpose, and which comes home to our very business 
and bosoms. We are taught by our Saviour to regard the 
Divine Being in the character of a parent — as our Father — 
to observe the extension of his care, and his providence 
over all that are indebted to him for existence — to the 
tery birds and to the flowers ; and then we are taught to 
be merciful, as our Father who is in heaven is merciful. 



ABSOLUTE POWER. 

Who that has watched his own heart, or observed 
others, does not feel that man is not fit to be trusted with 
absolute, irresponsible power over men ? It must be abused. 
The selfish passions and pride of our nature will as surely 
abuse it, as the storm will ravage, or the ocean swell and 
roar under the whirlwind. A being, so ignorant, so head- 
strong, so passionate as man, ought not to be trusted with 
this terrible dominion. He ought not to desire it. He 
ought to dread it. He ought to cast it from him, as most 
perilous to himself and others. 

Absolute power was not meant for man. There is, 
indeed, an exception to this rule. There is one case, in 
which God puts a human being wholly defenceless, into 
another's hands. I refer to the child, who is wholly sub- 
jected to the parent's will. But observe how carefully, I 
might almost say anxiously, God has provided against the 
abuse of this power. He has raised up in the heart of the 
parent, a friend and a guardian. He has fitted the parent 
for this trust, by teaching him to love his child better than 
himself. No eloquence on earth is so subduing as the 
moaning of the infant when in pain. No reward is sweeter 
than that infant's smile. Thus God has fenced and se- 
cured from abuse the power of the parent ; and yet even 
the parent has been known, in a moment of passion, to be 
cruel to his child. Is man, then, to be trusted with abso- 
lute power over a fellow-creature, who, instead of being 
commended by nature to his tenderest love, belongs to a 
despised race, is regarded as property, is made the passive 
instrument of his gratification and gain ? I ask no docu- 
ments to prove the abuses of this power, nor do I care 
what is said to disprove them. Millions may rise up and 
tell me, that the slave suffers little from cruelty. I know 
too much of human nature, human history, human passion, 
to believe them. 



A TITLE TO DISTINCTION. 

He who cannot see a brother, a child of God, a man 
possessing all the rights of humanity, under a skin darker 
than his own, wants the vision of a Christian. 

To look unmoved on the degradation and wrongs of a 
fellow creature, because burned by a fiercer s^un, proves 



us strangers to that justice and love which characterise 
Christianity. The greatest of all distinctions, the only 
enduring one, is moral goodness, virtue, religion. Out- 
ward distinctions cannot add to the dignity of this. The 
wealth of worlds is not sufficient for a burnt-offering on 
its altar. A being capable of this, is invested by God 
with solemn claims on his fellow-creatures. To exclude 
millions of such beings from our sympathy, because of 
outward disadvantages, proves that, in whatever else we 
may surpass them, we are not their superiors in Christian 
virtue. 



THE TRUE MOTIVE. 

The first question to be proposed by a rational being is, 
not what is profitable, but what is right. Duty must be 
primary, prominent, most conspicuous, among the objects 
of human thought and pursuit. If we cast it down from 
its supremacy, if we inquire first for our interests and then 
for our duties, we shall certainly err. We can never see 
the right clearly and fully, but by making it our first con- 
cern. No judgment can be just or wise, but that which 
is built on the conviction of the paramount worth and im- 
portance of duty. 

In seeking and adhering to the right, we secure our 
true and only happiness. All prosperity not founded on 
it, is built on sand. If human aflfairs are controlled, as 
we believe, by Almighty rectitude and impartial goodness, 
then to hope for happiness from wrong doing, is as insane 
as to seek health and prosperity, by rebelling against the 
laws of nature, by sowing our seed on the ocean, or 
making poison our common food. 

\ 

LOVE OF THE WORLD. 

There is nothing to be gotten by the world's love ; no- 
thing to be lost (but its love) by its hate. Why then should 
I seek that love that cannot profit me, or fear that malice 
that cannot hurt me 1 Let it then hate me, and I will for- 
give it ; but if it love me, I will never requite it. For 
since its love is hurtful, and its hate harmless, I will con- 
temn its hate, and hate its love.